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 Gluten Free Exotic Flours

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Bete'avon!
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PostSubject: Gluten Free Exotic Flours   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:27 am

There are so many flours on the market I thought I would gather all info I can on each of these special ones all in one place, save time later when I want to bake something. So that is what this thread is for, for all you bakers out there! They are presented in alef-bet order for ease of location. Smile


Last edited by on Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:39 am; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Amaranth   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:34 am

amaranth [Amaranthaceae] Many varieties; related to spinach, beets and pigweed. Tiny seeds are commercially available whole, or ground into a light brown flour with a nutty taste. Highly nutritious. Edible leaves.

Once a native of Mexico and Central America and claimed that the Aztec used this amazing flour until the conquistadors came in the 14th century and decimated the people, it is making a comeback. This plant can even be grown in the home garden and requires little attention. But best to buy either as cereal grain or for baking , flour.

Taste: strong nutty, bran-like taste so it shouldn't be used in too great a quantity. 15/20% maximum is recommended.

Wheat comparative: a bit more protein, and 1/3 more fat,

Storage: should be bought fresh, and stored in fridge.

Other info: flakes are also sold as cereal and can replace rolled oats in some recipes

Allergy info: closely related to pigweed

Sources:


Last edited by on Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:44 am; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Buckwheat   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:35 am

buckwheat [Fagopyrum esculentum] Herb with triangular-shaped seed and black shell, used whole, cracked or ground into flour. This plant came to the new world via Europe but was originally from China. Most Buckwheat flours don't have much fat so keep well. Can be used as a cereal or flour. The cereal is called groats or kasha.

Taste: Slighly astringent

Wheat comparative: Similar to wheat in protein and Carbs,

Storage: Cool Dry cupboard

Other info: B vitamins

Allergy info: http://makura.com/lang/allergyinfo.html

Sources: Shiloh Farms organic buckwheat flour, bob's red mill organic, Hodgson Mill


Last edited by on Wed Oct 17, 2007 11:52 pm; edited 3 times in total
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PostSubject: Millet   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:35 am

Millet [Panicum miliaceum] Drought-tolerant grasses with small seeds which can be substituted for sorghum in most recipes. of the grass family ( rice , corn), was originally brought to the US as a feed grain for livestock. In Europe and Asia it is a crop for human consumption.

Taste: Mild.

Wheat comparative: Higher nutritional value than wheat

Storage: Same as wheat so cool dry cupboard is fine

Other info: 73% Carb (wheat is 76)10% protein, 3% fat and fiber, higer in magnesium

Allergy info: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1034/j.1398-9995.2003.00101.x

Sources: Shiloh Farms organic, Bob's Red Mill, www.samisbakery.com/order_form.pdf+Sami%27s+Gluten-free+Millet+and+Flax+Bread&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=5&gl=us&client=firefox-a" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sami's Bakery




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PostSubject: Montina   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:36 am

Native to the US and is an Indian rice grass, and has tested GF. Color is a dark greyish brown, so looks similar to bran flour.

Taste:
Rather bland , like the rice , but should be used with highly flavored item, bananas, nuts, chocolate, seeds, coffee. It helps to darken a bread instead of the stark white of rice. On the sweet and robust side which difers from rice.

Wheat comparative: Much higher in fiber 15% compared to only 3% of wheat

Storage: Best in refridgerator in sealed container

Other info: In humid weather use less liquid than called for.

Allergy info: Could find no source of allergy info

Sources: Amazing Grains


Last edited by on Thu Oct 18, 2007 12:27 am; edited 6 times in total
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PostSubject: Quinoa   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:36 am

Quinoa Pronounced Keen - wah[Chenopodiacum quinoa Willd.] Seed of ancient cereal grain of Peru, related to amaranth. Quinoa's
origins are truly ancient. It was one of the three staple foods, along
with corn and potatoes, of the Inca civilization. Versatile; can be substituted for any grain. Used whole; as a hot cereal; ground into flour. Adds moisture to baked goods.

Taste: Mild nutty flavor.

Wheat comparative: creamy white, can replace rice in recipes

Storage: Cool dry cupboard

Other info: It has a bitter coating that must be washed away either at the plant or in the home. High in protein ( 16%) and a complete protein similar to milk, contains potassium and calcium

Allergy info: Easy to digest, a fruit of the
Chenopodium family. Chenopodium plants have characteristic leaves
shaped like a goose foot. The genus also includes our common weed,
lambís quarters. Quinoa is an annual herb,
Saponin, a component of the pericarp of quinoa seed, is a known toxic glycoside.

Sources: Organic Quinoa
Bob's Red Mill, Arrowhead Mills



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PostSubject: Sorghum   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:36 am

Sorghum, milo [Sorghum bicolor L. Moench] Drought-tolerant cereal grain used primarily as a flour or sweet syrup. Third most prevalent food crop worldwide. Origin Africa. Certified food grade white sorghum has been specially developed for the food industry. Now more refined breeding for human consumption. Should not be used alone, but in combo with other flours.

Taste: Mild, sweet, goes well with bean flours

Wheat comparative: In the same family as sugar cane, rice and corn, Same protein as Wheat, and fiber

Storage: Cool, dry cupboard

Other info: Contains iron and B vitamins

Allergy info: Pollen issues

Sources: Barry Farm foods
Bob's Red mill also has it


Last edited by on Thu Oct 18, 2007 12:49 am; edited 3 times in total
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PostSubject: Teff ( or Tef)   Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:37 am

[Eragrostis tef] (tef grass or teff) Very small black ancient grain of the millet family. Principal grain in Ethiopian bread (Injera), which is described as a soft, porous, thin pancake. Comes in ivory, red or brown, or dark some call it. Can be used as a cereal or flour.

Taste: Like wheat, dark teff can be used to make graham like products

Wheat comparative: more nutritious

Storage: Higher fat contend, store in fridge or freezer

Other info: Related to rice family, corn , millet and sorghum

Allergy info:

Sources: Bob's red mill, Shiloh Farms,

Indigenous Ethiopian INjera bread recipe


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PostSubject: Re: Gluten Free Exotic Flours   Thu Oct 11, 2007 7:36 am

I use Chickpea flour (Gram Flour) which we found at an Indian/asian market. I find it works well in 'bean' breads, and adds an interesting flavor and texture.

I also use Rice flour (glutenous and plain rice) from the Asian market, with Potato Starch and Tapioca Starch mixed in (6 cups rice flour, 2 cups potato starch, 1 cup tapioca starch) as my main bread mix.

There's also one that is great for really light biscuits and breads - but it doesn't work in all recipes (3 cups Rice Flour, 3 cups Tapioca Starch, 3 cups Cornstarch, 3 cups Potato Flour) It's called a 'featherlight mix'. Unsure who came up with it, but my family has been using these now for 4 years. There's an alternative for the cornstarch for those who are corn sensitive, but I don't remember if it is Sorgum or amaranth that is subsituted.

Quinoa is great sometimes if you are making Corn based items to add more flexibility (read: lighter texture) to the mix - example cornbread. Do half Cornmeal and half Quinoa.

Cornflour/Cornmeal can be procured at Asian or Indian markets if not readily available in supermarkets (so I have found overseas). Often comes from India by way of the UK.. or straight from the USA. Usually it has two textures - white or yellow.

I have found that Guar Gum works better with these than xanthan gum (corn based) and adds a nicer texture (more like regular wheat bread). I haven't found anything 100% comprable to Wheat bread yet.
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